Workplace Safety

Are you safe at work? Every year, hundreds of youth are injured or killed on the job, many of them within days of starting a new job. In 2006, 97 workers between 15 and 29 died in the workplace in Canada. You and your employer each have rights and responsibilities for creating a safe and healthy workplace. Want to learn more? Start by reviewing the information below.

The Basics:

Why is health and safety awareness important?

  • It could save your life!
  • Proper training is vital for your safety and could prevent you from getting injured.
  • You need to be aware of potential hazards in the workplace.
  • You need to help others become aware.
  • You need to know what protection and compensation are available to you.

You have three fundamental rights as an employee:

  • The right to know;
  • The right to participate; and
  • The right to refuse unsafe work.

Employer's responsibilities:

  • To provide a safe and healthy workplace.
  • To train employees on potential hazards and to ensure employees have the required certification.
  • To correct unsafe actions and conditions.
  • To ensure protective equipment is available and being used.
  • To report and investigate all accidents and incidents.

Employee's responsibilities:

  • To know and comply with all regulations.
  • To protect yourself, your co-workers, and members of the public who may be affected by your actions.
  • To report unsafe actions and unsafe conditions to your employer.
  • To use protective equipment, as required by the employer.
  • To report any accident, incident, or illness immediately to your employer.

Observation, learning, and experience are the keys to recognizing potential safety hazards in the workplace!

Source: Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS).

Have you been injured on the job? You may be able to apply for compensation. Check with your province or territory for more information. Links are provided below.

Helpful Web Sites:

The sites listed below have information about protecting yourself, knowing your rights in the workplace, and applying for compensation if you have been injured on the job.

National

You can find information on many aspects of health and safety at work, including issues about specific jobs at the Young Workers Zone of the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Web site.

If you work in a federally regulated sector of the economy, such as banking, telecommunications, broadcasting, air, interprovincial rail, road and pipeline transportation, shipping or crown corporations, you can find your health and safety standards at the federal Labour Program Web site.

Provincial and Territorial

Alberta

You can learn how to work safely and better know your rights by reviewing Alberta's New and Young Workers Web pages.

If you are injured on the job in Alberta, the Workers' Compensation Board (WCB) of Alberta Web site offers information on applying for compensation, plus links to report injuries and file an application.

British Columbia

You can learn how to work safely by reviewing the Workers' Compensation Board of British Columbia's Safety at Work Web pages.

If you are injured on the job in British Columbia, you can get help and apply for compensation through the Workers' Compensation Board of British Columbia's WorkSafeBC Web site.

Manitoba

You can learn how to work safely by reviewing the Workers' Compensation Board of Manitoba's Safe Work Manitoba Web site.

If you are injured on the job in Manitoba, the Workers' Compensation Board of Manitoba Web site provides information to help you file a claim for compensation.

New Brunswick

You can learn how to work safely in New Brunswick and how to file a claim for compensation if you are injured on the job by visiting the WorkSafeNB Web site.

Newfoundland and Labrador

Help to file a workplace injury compensation claim is available at the Workplace Health, Safety & Compensation Commission of Newfoundland and Labrador Web site.

Northwest Territories and Nunavut

You can learn how to work safely and become aware of your workplace rights and responsibilities by reviewing the Information for Young Workers Web pages from the Workers' Compensation Board of Northwest Territories and Nunavut.

Help with filing a workplace injury compensation claim is available at the Workers' Compensation Board - Northwest Territories and Nunavut Web site.

Nova Scotia

Learn your rights and responsibilities for workplace safety, or to file a workplace injury compensation claim, at the Workers’ Compensation Board of Nova Scotia Web site.

Ontario

Learn your rights and responsibilities for workplace safety, or to file a workplace injury compensation claim, at the Ontario Ministry of Labour Web site.

Help with filing a workplace injury compensation claim is available at the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board of Ontario Web site.

Prince Edward Island

Learn to work safely through the tips available at the Safety Matters @ Work Web site from the Workers' Compensation Board of Prince Edward Island.

Find the information you need to report an injury at work and file a claim for compensation at the Workers' Compensation Board- Prince Edward Island Web site.

Quebec

You can learn more about how to prevent workplace accidents at the Commission de la santé et de la sécurité au travail Web site.

Review information about protecting yourself on the job and filing for benefits if you are injured at the Ma santé et ma sécurité au travail en cinq points Web site (available in French only).

Saskatchewan

Raise your awareness of workplace safety issues at the Work Safe Saskatchewan web site.

If you have been injured on the job, you can get more information about applying for compensation at the Saskatchewan Workers' Compensation Board (WCB) Web site.

Yukon

To find out more about workplace safety and what to do if you are injured on the job, visit the Yukon Workers' Compensation Health and Safety Board Web site.